Allegations of interference in Presidential election by US denied by Russia and Iran

On Thursday, Iran and Russia strongly denied US allegations of acting to influence public opinion ahead of the US presidential election on November 3.

Less than two weeks before the vote, Washington accused Iran of sending "spoofed" e-mails to Americans "designed to intimidate voters, incite social unrest, and harm President Donald Trump."

Iran also distributed a video implying that people could send in fraudulent ballots, including from outside the United States, according to US National Intelligence Director John Ratcliffe.

US authorities "have put forward a baseless claim on the verge of the country's election so that by shifting the blame they would advance their undemocratic and predefined scenario," Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Saeed Khatibzadeh said in a statement.

He called the charges "fabricated and clumsy" and repeated the stance of Iran that it does not favor either Trump or Joe Biden, the Democratic challenger.

As ties were cut after the 1979 Islamic revolution, the Swiss embassy in Tehran dealt with US interests in Iran. The Swiss ambassador was summoned after the allegation was provoked by the US.

Since 2018, when Trump unilaterally pulled the US out of a landmark nuclear agreement with Iran and reinstated crippling sanctions in a "maximum pressure" policy against the Islamic Republic, tensions between the two governments have increased sharply.

"Ratcliffe also pointed his finger at Russia, saying that both Tehran and Moscow are trying to" communicate false information to registered voters that they hope will cause confusion, sow chaos and undermine trust in American democracy.

The Kremlin stated that the charges were "absolutely groundless."

"Every day, indictments rain down. They are all completely groundless, not based on anything, ”said Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov.

Khatibzadeh urged the US to "put an end to the pointless projection of blame, baseless accusations, and the creation of suspicious scenarios and try to act like a normal nation."

Alireza Miryousefi, Iran's ambassador to the United Nations, called the allegations "another scenario to undermine the confidence of voters" in the US and said that the world had seen Washington's attempts to "question the results of its own elections at the highest level."

After registered Democratic voters reported receiving personally addressed e-mails in the name of the Proud Boys militia, and from the Proud Boys Internet domain, the US announcement came. In Florida and other battleground states, several voters said they had received messages.

After registered Democratic voters reported receiving personally addressed e-mails in the name of the Proud Boys militia, and from the Proud Boys Internet domain, the US announcement came. In Florida and other battleground states, several voters said they had received messages.

"On election day, you're going to vote for Trump or we're going to come after you," the e-mails said. Change your party affiliation to Republican to let us know that you have received and will comply with our message. We're going to know which applicant you voted for,' they said. 'I would take this seriously if I were you,' ends the message, adding the address of the voter. Ratcliffe did not explain to the FBI how the Russians and Iranians had obtained information about the vote.

Publish : 2020-10-22 21:54:00
# DonaldTrump # Russia # Joe Biden # Russian Probe # Iran # Presidential Elections